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marijuana for tooth pain

Active ingredients in marijuana found to spread and prolong pain

Imagine that you’re working on your back porch, hammering in a nail. Suddenly you slip and hit your thumb instead — hard. The pain is incredibly intense, but it only lasts a moment. After a few seconds (and a few unprintable words) you’re ready to start hammering again.

How can such severe pain vanish so quickly? And why is it that other kinds of equally terrible pain refuse to go away, and instead torment their victims for years?

University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston researchers think they’ve found at least part of the answer—and believe it or not, it’s in a group of compounds that includes the active ingredients in marijuana, the cannabinoids. Interestingly enough, given recent interest in the medical use of marijuana for pain relief, experiments with rodents and humans described in a paper published in the current issue of Science suggest these “endocannabinoids,” which are made within the human body, can actually amplify and prolong pain rather than damping it down.

“In the spinal cord there’s a balance of systems that control what information, including information about pain, is transmitted to the brain,” said UTMB professor Volker Neugebauer, one of the authors of the Science article, along with UTMB senior research scientist Guangchen Ji and collaborators from Switzerland, Hungary, Japan, Germany, France and Venezuela. “Excitatory systems act like a car’s accelerator, and inhibitory ones act like the brakes. What we found is that in the spinal cord endocannabinoids can disable the brakes.”

To get to this conclusion, the researchers began by studying what happened when they applied a biochemical mimic of an endocannabinoid to inhibitory neurons (the brakes, in Neugebauer’s analogy) on slices of mouse spinal cord. Electrical signals that would ordinarily have elicited an inhibitory response were ignored. They then repeated the procedure using slices of spinal cord from mice genetically engineered to lack receptors where the endocannabinoid molecules could dock, and found that in that case, the “brakes” worked. Finally, using electron microscopy, they confirmed that the receptors were in fact on inhibitory, not excitatory neurons. Endocannabinoids docking with them would suppress the inhibitor neurons, and leave pain signals with a straight shot to the brain.

“The next step was to make the leap from spinal slices to test whether this really had anything to do with pain,” Neugebauer said. Using anesthetized rats, he recorded the spinal cord electrical activity produced by an injection in the hindpaw of capsaicin- a chemical found in hot peppers that produces a level of pain he compared to a severe toothache. Although the rats were unconscious, pain impulses could be detected racing up their spinal cords. What’s more, formerly benign stimuli now generated a significant pain response — a response that stopped when the rats were treated with an endocannabinoid receptor blocker.

“Why was this non-painful information now gaining access to the spinal “pain” neurons?” Neugebauer said. “The capsaicin produced an overstimulation that led to the peripheral nerves releasing endocannabinoids, which activated receptors that shut down the inhibitor neurons, leaving the gates wide open.”

Finally, the researchers recruited human volunteers to determine whether a compound that blocked endocannabinoid receptors would have an effect on the increased sensitivity to pain (hyperalgesia) and tendency for normally non-painful stimuli to induce pain (allodynia) often reported in areas of the body near where acute pain had been inflicted. In this case, the researchers induced pain by passing electricity through the volunteers’ left forearms, with the intensity of the current set by each volunteer to a 6 on a scale of 1 to 10. At a second session a month later, the volunteers who had received the receptor blocker showed no reduction in perceived acute pain, but had significantly less hyperalgesia and allodynia — a result that matched up well with the endocannabinoid hypothesis.

“To sum up, we’ve discovered a novel mechanism that can transform transient normal pain into persistent chronic pain,” Neugebauer said. “Persistent pain is notoriously difficult to treat, and this study offers insight into new mechanisms and possibly a new target in the spinal cord.”

It also raises questions about the efficacy of marijuana in relieving acute pain, given that endocannabinoids and the cannabinoids found in marijuana are so biochemically similar. “If you had a toothache, you probably wouldn’t want to treat it with marijuana, because you could actually make it worse,” Neugebauer said. “Now, for more pathological conditions like neuropathic pain, where the problem is a dysfunction within the nerves themselves and a subsequent disturbance throughout the nervous system that’s not confined to the pain system, marijuana may be beneficial. There are studies that seem to show that. But our model shows cannabinoids over-activating the pain system, and it just doesn’t seem like a good idea to further increase this effect.”

Source: University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston (news : web)

Active ingredients in marijuana found to spread and prolong pain Imagine that you’re working on your back porch, hammering in a nail. Suddenly you slip and hit your thumb instead — hard. The pain

Can CBD Soothe The Pain Of A Toothache?

Have You Asked Your Dentist About CBD Oil For Toothaches?

If you haven’t, why not? It’s widely known that THC and CBD have anti-inflammatory, and bone-stimulating properties which can help with severe conditions such as arthritis, why not use it for dental pain and swelling?

So, should you consider trying CBD oil the next time you get a toothache? Let’s look at some causes of tooth pain, and how CBD can help combat it.

What Causes Tooth Pain?

There can be many reasons for a toothache, but most of the time, the cause of a toothache is an infection. Bacteria buildup on the teeth and gums eventually spread to the nerves and blood vessels located on the inner part of the teeth. Infrequent brushing and poor hygiene help bacteria thrive.

Whatever the cause of pain might be, it is always recommended to visit a medical professional if you have a long-lasting or a severe toothache. Moreover, a professional check-up and cleaning every 6 months or 1 year is always advisable as a method of prevention for any dental disease.

Since there still isn’t enough research into the use of CBD in dentistry, the benefits have not been investigated thoroughly. As it is difficult to dose CBD, the results are inconsistent. Some patients find pain relief from their toothache with CBD oil, and some do not.

Watch Out For “Cottonmouth”

Those who consume cannabis know about cottonmouth. It’s a common symptom that happens whether you are consuming cannabis with THC or hemp with CBD. Cottonmouth just simply means dry mouth. Typically after consuming cannabis people may feel that their mouth becomes dry and they feel thirsty.

It’s important to remember that when recovering from any dental surgery, saliva is important. It contains antibacterial compounds that keep bacterial growth in check. Saliva also contains enzymes and proteins essential to tooth and gum health.

This is the reason it is important to be careful when using CBD oil to treat a toothache. Like THC, it also causes dry mouth. You just need to drink plenty of water and stay hydrated. You can also chew gum if you feel your mouth is getting dry to stimulate saliva production. Dry mouth due to CBD oil treatment goes away after some time. Dry mouth will happen less often when your body adjusts to the presence of CBD.

Tooth Extraction

Plain & Simple: DO NOT Smoke Cannabis After Tooth Extraction

Your dentist will warn you not to smoke after tooth extraction because smoking may cause dry socket. What is a dry socket? After removing one of the permanent teeth, a blood clot forms where it was removed. This clot of blood is important for healing, as it protects the bone and nerve endings.

When you smoke, the sucking motion causes pressure on your gums. This pressure is enough to damage the blood clot and a dry hole is formed. If the blood clot is removed, dissolved, or not completely formed, the nerve endings and bone become prone to infection. This condition is accompanied by severe pain in the oral cavity and in the face and requires immediate attention from the dentist.

How long should you wait before smoking cannabis after Wisdom Tooth Extraction?

People often ask : “How soon can I smoke cannabis after tooth extraction?

After your tooth has been removed, you should give up smoking for a period of two days to 1 week. If you really need to smoke, try to wait for 2 days but a 7 day period would be optimal to ensure that the wound has completely healed.

If you really need your fix of THC or CBD it is better for you to use edibles while the wound is healing.

Dry socket can be far worse than you think. It is worth waiting for the healing process to finish before smoking cannabis again.

Do you have any experience consuming cannabis after a tooth extraction? Do you use CBD oil to manage dental pain? Leave a comment and stay healthy!

Have you asked your dentist about CBD Oil for toothaches? It’s widely known that CBD has anti-inflammatory.