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is marijuana an aphrodisiac

New Studies Show That Marijuana Enhances And Increases Sex

Sexpot accouterments including (clockwise) eggplant emoji clutch, Crystal Journey Seduction candle, . [+] Monq aromatherapy diffusers in Love and Sexy, Dr. Dabber vape pen, Sensi Chew Amore cannabis-infused aphrodisiac caramels, Christian Louboutin patent leather boudoir shoes and rolling papers.

© Sara Brittany Somerset

Recent scientific studies substantiate what many marijuana users have claimed all along — that it enhances sexual relations. Currently, almost all research into the effects of the cannabis plant is prohibited by t he U.S. government due to its classification as a Schedule I substance. However, 31 states and the District of Columbia have legalized medical marijuana, while nine states have also legalized adult use of recreational marijuana. Legalization benefits academia, as it finally allows researchers to study and analyze marijuana’s effects, including its impact on sexual intercourse.

According to a research study in the Journal of Sexual Medicine (JSM), entitled the Association Between Marijuana Use and Sexual Frequency in the United States: A Population-Based Study, the goal of the study was, “To elucidate whether a relation between marijuana use and sexual frequency exists using a nationally representative sample of reproductive-age men and women.”

T he analysis represented 28,176 women and 22,943 men nationwide who were surveyed by the Center for Disease Control (CDC) via a questionnaire. The CDC’s broad, all-encompassing survey is often utilized by researchers as a basis for further, more specific analysis.

Researchers Dr. Michael L. Eisenberg and Dr. Andrew J. Sun are both affiliated with the Department of Urology, at Stanford University, in California. The duo accessed the CDC’s study to research marijuana’s effects on male sexual and reproductive function, which is Dr. Eisenberg’s area of expertise. As such, he sees men with various forms of sexual dysfunction. As for medical or lifestyle factors that may influence function, he is often asked about what role, if any that marijuana may play.

The clinical implications of their study revealed that “Marijuana use is independently associated with increased sexual frequency and does not appear to impair sexual function.” In fact, daily users across all demographic groups reported having 20% more sex than those who have never used cannabis.

Dr. Eisenberg thinks doing more research in this area is important. Previously, most doctors had generally counseled men that marijuana, like tobacco, is harmful. However, his current study suggests that may not be the case.

An additional JSM-published study entitled, The Relationship Between Marijuana Use Prior to Sex and Sexual Function in Women , conducted at Saint Louis University in Missouri claims, “The internet is rife with claims regarding the ability of marijuana to improve the sexual experience; however, scientific data is lacking.” The objective of this study “is to determine if marijuana use before sex affects the sexual experience, by how much, and which domains of sexual function are affected.”

In this survey, researchers polled 133 sexually-active adult women at one particular, academic ObGyn practice, during their annual check-ups. The female patients filled out a lengthy questionnaire regarding marijuana use before sex (hashtag #MUBS).

Thirty-eight women (29%) disclosed consuming cannabis prior to copulation. Of those 38 women, 68 percent reported more pleasurable sex, 16% said it ruined their sexual experience, while the remaining 16% were undecided or unaware.

Among the enhanced sexuality camp, 72% said it always increased their erotic pleasure, while 24% said it sometimes did. Almost 62% said it enhanced the quality of their orgasms and their libidos in general. Additionally, 16% of MUBS adherents disclosed they purposefully puff pot prior to sex, specifically to relieve any potential pain associated with the act. There were conflicting reports as to whether or not it enhanced vaginal lubrication.

The same research team later widened the scope of their survey to 289 adult MUBS women, with similar results: 65% decided it enhanced their sexual experience, 23% said it did not matter one way or the other, 9% had no significant feedback and 3% said it sabotaged their sexual experience.

Dr. Monica Grover of Asira Medical is double Board certified in Family Medicine and Gynecology, with practices in both Midtown, Manhattan and Westchester, New York. Although she did not participate in either clinical study, she is currently conducting independent research.

“Although some studies have shown results that are equivocal, anecdotally patients have reported positive feedback,” says Dr. Grover.

“Consumption of small quantities [of marijuana] prior to sex may increase libido in female patients, which in turn can release positive endorphins and increase vaginal lubrication.”

Dr. Grover believes this may be due to the short-term anxiolytic of cannabis. In women. Reduced sexual libido in women usually correlates with any anxiety or stress they are experiencing. So, in the short-term, cannabis has anxiety-reducing effects. However, in the long-term, it can increase anxiety, which may explain the lack of libido in possible habitual users. Dr. Grover is currently working on a study to determine this theory.

Notable clinical implications among male users reported in the Stanford study were that Cannabis does not impair sexual function nearly as much as alcohol does. Nor are there any contraindications of mixing marijuana with other drugs for sexual performance enhancement such as Viagra or Cialis.

Additionally, and perhaps most importantly, unlike alcohol, so far there is no direct correlation between marijuana consumption and a significantly increased risk of fatalities.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), a n estimated 88,0008 people (approximately 62,000 men and 26,000 women) die from alcohol-related causes annually, making alcohol the third leading preventable cause of death in the United States. The Journal of the American Medical Association corroborates these findings. The first preventable cause of death in the United States is tobacco use and the second is poor diet combined with physical inactivity. These findings may help build the case for consuming cannabis to become more sexually active to benefit one’s overall health.

Which gives new meaning to the term, sexpot.

The Best Cannabis Strains for 8 Different Types of Sex and Sensation

Set aside the chocolate and oysters, there’s a new aphrodisiac in town that can help take your sexual pleasure to another level. Yep, we’re talking about cannabis.

Though research continues into cannabis and its benefits in and out of the bedroom, 68.5 percent of people in one study said sex while using cannabis was more pleasurable.

Curious? So were we. So we reached out to John Renko, cannabis expert and cofounder of GoLove CBD Naturals and Jordan Tishler, MD, a Harvard physician and medical cannabis therapeutics specialist who runs InhaleMD.

They shared more on choosing the right strain and product for the most mind-blowing sexual experience — no matter what type of mood you’re in.

Experts disagree on the role strains play when it comes to effects. Dr. Tishler believes strains lead to different preferences during sex, but don’t guarantee any outcomes. He advises his patients to ignore strains altogether and focus on dosing and method of delivery.

Renko believes the real magic lies in the terpenes when it comes to defining the effects of each strain.

Terpenes are compounds found in plants that are responsible for the aroma and flavor. If one cannabis plant smells like diesel and another reminds you of lemons — that’s terpenes at work.

Terpenes impact the different effects of cannabis, though how is not clear yet. The research into strains’ individual traits — and how those might affect humans — continues.

To ramp up your sex drive, Renko recommends choosing strains with high levels of the terpene limonene, like Do-Si-Dos and Wedding Cake.

Both are indica-dominant, high-THC hybrids that hit you fast with a body-warming euphoria before melting to blissful relaxation.

Strains containing the terpene linalool — known for a nice calming effect — are the way to go to enhance your solo session, according to Renko.

LA Confidential, an indica, and Amnesia Haze, a sativa, are popular strains that fit the bill when it comes to making self-pleasure a full afternoon activity.

Users report a slow start before an intense euphoria with a gradual come down. Sounds a lot like a good orgasm, no?

This is where cannabis really shines. Along with plenty of convincing anecdotal evidence, current research also shows that cannabis may reduce anxiety.

A small 2018 study analyzed cannabinoids and terpene levels of different strains. Participants rated those most effective at treating their anxiety.

Looks like getting your “Kush” on is the way to go if any self-consciousness is making your adult playtime less enjoyable.

The top strains for anxiety were:

  • Bubba Kush, an indica
  • Skywalker OG Kush, an indica-dominant hybrid
  • Blueberry Lamsbread, a sativa-dominant hybrid
  • Kosher Kush, an indica

There’s evidence that cannabis relieves pain and past studies have found that indicas seem to be the preference when it comes to pain relief.

If you’re worried about pain putting a damper on sex, look for strains with terpenes that might ease pain, such as beta-caryophyllene, humulene, myrcene, and caryophyllene, according to Renko. His top pick is the strain Zkittlez.

Zkittelz is an indica-dominant hybrid with a strong beta-caryophyllene and humulene profile.

Other strains to try:

  • G13, a potent indica
  • Cannatonic, a low-THC, high-CBD hybrid
  • Harlequin, a sativa-dominant strain

If you’re looking to break out of your comfort zone when it comes to sex, there’s anecdotal evidence that some strains can help.

Based on online user reviews, these strains lower your inhibitions and boost your confidence:

  • Granddaddy Purple, an indica
  • Trainwreck, a potent sativa-dominant hybrid
  • Atomic Northern Lights, an indica-dominant hybrid
  • Blue Dream, a sativa-dominant hybrid

Some strains, especially with the right dosing, can give you the energy to keep up with the most enthusiastic of bedmates.

Based on online user reviews, these are the strains to consider if you’re in the mood for an Energizer Bunny-esque romp:

  • Green Crack, a sativa
  • Cheese Quake, a hybrid
  • Super Lemon Haze, a zesty sativa

Any cannabis stain will make you chill if you use too much, so look for relaxing strains and dose right to ensure the right level of chill for turning up the heat.

Try these relaxing strains:

  • Master Kush, an indica
  • Mr. Nice, a sativa
  • Animal Cookies, a balanced hybrid

Many a seasoned cannabis user will tell you that certain strains increase sensitivity to touch and change tactile sensations for the better.

Everyone’s different, so some strains may enhance touch for you, while your partner’s body may respond to different strains.

If you’ve been enjoying cannabis for a while, Renko recommends balancing out your fave THC-dominant strain with a CBD-dominant strain like ACDC. It gives you a “rich terpene profile coupled with the synergistic effect of CBD and THC.”

ACDC is a sativa-dominant strain with 14 percent CBD and less than 1 percent THC.

Here are some other strains to really ramp up erogenous play and give you the tingles:

  • Bubblegum Kush, an indica-dominant strain
  • Sour Diesel, a pungent sativa
  • Jillybean, an indica-dominant strain

There’s no simple answer to this question, because these classifications are less important than the terpenes in a strain, according to Renko.

“Those actually are just physiological plant classifications made around the physical plant properties and not its flower profile, which is where the focus should be,” he explained.

There’s no right or wrong strain for sex. The best one for that encounter will depend on how your body responds to specific strains and on the type of romp you’re aiming for.

Both Dr. Tishler and Renko agree that edibles aren’t the best way to go for partnered sex because they’re too slow and unpredictable.

Edibles need to pass through your digestive system before they take effect. Your BMI and other factors also affect how quickly they kick in.

Chances are you’ll peak at different times than your partner, have sex long before you feel anything, or end up ingesting a dose that isn’t optimal.

If edibles are your preference, they’re probably better saved for a solo sesh.

Here are a few to tickle your taste buds and nether regions:

  • 1906 Love Chocolates. These sexy treats combine five herbal aphrodisiacs with cannabis for a physical and psychological high that peaks at around two hours after ingestion.
  • Kikoko Sensuali-Tea. The ingredients in this cannabis tea sound as sexy as it’s supposed to make you feel! Rose petals, hibiscus, and lavender are just a few ingredients that are combined with cannabis to arouse passion in anyone who drinks it.

Loads of things! But since we’re talking about cannabis and sex, here are a few other cannabis products made with sexy time in mind.

THC or CBD lube

THC and CBD-infused lube is a thing — and a damn wonderful thing according to many who’ve tried them.

Makers of these lubes say they offer a number of benefits, from increased arousal to faster, more powerful orgasms. The scientific evidence to back some of the claims may not exist yet, but that doesn’t mean the benefits don’t.

Topical application of CBD can be slow to take effect and research is ongoing into ways to improve delivery for faster results. Still, that doesn’t mean that a cannabis-infused lube can’t give your sex life a little boost.

Sufficient lubrication is key to comfortable and enjoyable penetrative sex. Also, it just feels great.

If you want to give a THC or CBD lube a go, you have a few to choose from, starting with GoLove CBD Intimate Lubricant. John Renko is the cofounder of GoLove CBD Naturals, along with sexologist and bestselling-author Dr. Sadie Allison.

A couple more popular options are:

  • Foria Pleasure Lube (contains THC and CBD)
  • Kush Queen Ignite CBD Lube (contains hemp-derived CBD)
  • Velvet Swing Cannabis Sensual Lubricant (contains THC and CBD)

THC or CBD anal or vaginal suppositories

Clinical research on cannabis suppositories is limited.

There’s no solid evidence that they’re absorbed into the bloodstream via the anus or vagina, so don’t expect to get a high from them. This doesn’t mean they don’t have other effects that can help you below the belt.

Users of CBD and THC suppositories, like Foria Intimacy Suppositories, say they’re great lubricants that also help mitigate pain during and after anal or vaginal sex, as well as enhance sexual pleasure.

THC or CBD massage oil

Who doesn’t love a good, oily rub down? Since topicals don’t enter the bloodstream, this can be a nice way to make your body feel good physically, without the “high.”

Oils and condoms don’t play nice together, so be mindful of your method of protection.

Now that you’re armed with some cannabis strain and product ideas, here’s some advice to help you get the most out of the experience.

If you’ve never used cannabis during sex before, try solo sex first

If it’s your first foray into the world of cannabis or even your first time using it for sexual pleasure, trying it during solo play is a good idea.

This gives you the chance to see how you react to a product and whether or not it rocks your world. It can also help put any of your cannabis worries to rest if you’re concerned about any less-than-sexy effects.

Negotiate before you consume

Communication is key to great sex and it needs to happen before you get high. Cannabis can impair your judgment and cause sedation if you take too much.

Get consent and set clear boundaries before getting started. This is also the time to discuss safer sex and make sure you have barrier protection on hand.

Start low and go slow

Dosing can make or break your experience, so heed the advice of most experts and start low (dosage-wise) and go slow if you choose to consume more.

Dosing varies between the different methods of delivery, as does the time the effects take to kick in.

Inhalation methods and tinctures taken under the tongue are quick-acting methods, which make dosing a bit easier. You can tell within 10 minutes if you need another puff or a few drops, or know to stop if you’ve hit your sweet spot.

Keep water and lube on hand

There’s nothing sexy about cotton mouth or vaginal dryness when you’re trying to get your freak on. Make sure you stay hydrated in every way by keeping water and lube on hand.

There’s plenty of anecdotal evidence that cannabis makes sex better. Research even shows that cannabis users have more sex than non-users.

If you want to give it a try, cannabis is usually well-tolerated when used as directed. Be sure to purchase products or flower from a reputable, licensed source — and have fun exploring!

Adrienne Santos-Longhurst is a freelance writer and author who has written extensively on all things health and lifestyle for more than a decade. When she’s not holed-up in her writing shed researching an article or off interviewing health professionals, she can be found frolicking around her beach town with husband and dogs in tow or splashing about the lake trying to master the stand-up paddle board.

Last medically reviewed on February 4, 2020

Sure, you’ve heard it from friends, but the research is also in: Cannabis and sex is a potent and pleasurable combo. Experts told us how to choose the right strain and product for the most mind-blowing sexual experience — no matter what type of mood you’re in.