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How to Make Cannabis Coconut Oil (canna Oil)

Introduction: How to Make Cannabis Coconut Oil (canna Oil)

Cannabis coconut oil is a really versatile way to consume cannabis. It’s great taken alone or baked into all kinds of edibles – most strains of cannabis beautifully complement the flavor of coconut oil! Canna oil makes medicating super accessible, too – you can use indica, sativa, or even high CBD strains to get the desired effect you want.

It’s also super easy to make, and a great way to use up excess trim, kief or hash from harvest. In this instructable I’ll show you my favorite way to do it – simmering on the stove top! But I’ll tell you how to do it in a crockpot too.

This is a very fast and no-fuss version of canna oil – through lots of reading and quite a few experiments I really don’t believe it’s necessary to simmer it for-ev-errr and over complicate it. This method will give you a potent, tasty and fancy canna oil.

Step 1: What You’ll Need

tools:

  • cheesecloth
  • metal strainer/sieve
  • bowl or large measuring cup
  • jar or bowl to store the canna oil

materials:

  • decarboxylated cannabis (buds, trim, kief, hash – 40 grams)
  • unrefined coconut oil (2 cups)

We’ll talk a little about dosing on the next step.

Unsure how to decarboxylate cannabis? Click here to find out!

Step 2: Dosing + Strains + Expectations

(Pictured above – Doctor Who water hash, Doctor Who in bud form – so purple. Doctor Who sugar leaf trim)

What I’m using for this batch:

  • 2 cups unrefined coconut oil
  • 40 g Doctor Who trim, decarboxylated

This is a fairly strong dose – about 1.5 g of trim per tablespoon of canna oil. The medibles this canna oil makes will be used primarily for combating migraines so stronger is better!

Guidelines for dosing:

I recommend using anywhere from 0.5-1.5 g of trim/bud/hash/etc per tablespoon of oil. If this is your first time experimenting with canna oil, try using 16 grams of cannabis to 2 cups of oil.

When using buds, it’s okay to use less than you would if you were using trim as there will be more trichromes present and therefore more THC. If I was using buds instead of trim in this batch, I probably would have used 0.5 grams of bud per tablespoon of coconut oil.

For more information on dosing cannabis, I really recommend picking up a copy of The Ganja Kitchen Revolution by Jessica Catalano. The book includes a very nice dosing chart and explains how to demystify making edibles with the right amount of THC for you.

This article on The Cannabist also includes a helpful way of figuring out the THC content in edibles.

What to expect when using canna oil:

Cannabis taken orally a totally different beast – it can take you much longer to feel it, and the effects can linger much longer on average. Canna oil is often quite potent and can make you super sleepy, so never try a new dose when you have obligations later. πŸ˜‰

You can try to combat sleepiness by using only sativas in your canna oil, or by choosing a strain high in CBD. But it might still make you a teeny bit tired (edibles always do that to some folks!), so always use caution.

What to do if you take too much canna oil:

If you ever take too much while trying to figure out the proper dose, don’t worry! You may feel anxious or wonder why you ever thought this was a good idea – but I promise it will pass and the benefits are worth it.

Your best bet is to drink a glass of water and lie down. Sleeping is always the best possible way to handle having a bit too much cannabis.

If sleep seems unreachable, try dimming the lights and putting on music or the TV. You can try talking to someone too. Whatever relaxes you! Just keep in mind that it will pass in a few hours at most.

Step 3: Combine the Coconut Oil and Cannabis and Simmer

Combine the cannabis and coconut oil in a small saucepan over the lowest heat you can manage.

Once the coconut oil has melted, let the mix simmer uncovered (stirring ever so often) for an hour.

HEY! If you’d like to do this in a crockpot you definitely can. Just let it go on low for a couple hours. It’s not necessary to take it longer than that.

If your canna oil turns out super green or not green at all, that’s fine. The green-ness relates only to the chlorophyll present, not how strong the canna oil is.

Step 4: Strain

For straining, use cheesecloth in a sieve over a large measuring cup. A sieve normally isn’t fine enough on its own! It won’t matter too much if you end up with particulates in the oil, but it always looks nicer without them.

Place two layers of cheesecloth in the sieve and put it over the measuring cup.

Pour the hot oil and cannabis mixture into the cheesecloth.

Let it drip for an hour or so and then squeeze the rest out by hand.

You can use the processed cannabis in other things once you’ve squeezed out the oil, but it shouldn’t have much THC left in it at all. One of the most awesome ways is to mix it with softened butter – you end up with an awesome cannabis compound butter that you can use on toast or maybe even put a dollop on a steak or under the skin of a chicken.

However, don’t feel bad if you just compost it or throw it out – nearly all the good stuff is in the canna oil now!

Step 5: Cool and Store

Pour the canna oil into a glass jar or bowl and leave uncovered until room temperature and beginning to solidify. (Leaving it uncovered is very important because we want to avoid condensation forming in the jar)

Once entirely cooled, close the container and store in the fridge or in a cool dark place. This will keep for up to a year!

See how dark it is before and how light it is when it solidifies? That’s what it should look like if you don’t simmer it too long and you’re not too rough with it. If you poked it a ton it might be more green.

Step 6: Using Cannabis Coconut Oil

You can consume this coconut canna oil on its own or use it in edibles!

If this is your first time trying it, I recommend taking 1/4-1/2 tablespoon by mouth to start. Wait at least 3-4 hours before taking more. How you feel after this will let you know if you need to increase or decrease your dose. It will also give you a baseline for edibles.

If making edibles, try using recipes you’ve made before. Knowing how many cookies, muffins, slices of cake, etc. that a recipe produces will allow you to figure out about how much THC per serving there is. (Because we know we’re using a certain amount of cannabis per tablespoon of coconut oil – you can determine the strength based on the amount of oil you used in the recipe and how many servings it makes)

Another good thing to keep in mind: you can even do half canna oil and half butter if you need the edibles to be a little less strong.

How to Make Cannabis Coconut Oil (canna Oil): Cannabis coconut oil is a really versatile way to consume cannabis. It's great taken alone or baked into all kinds of edibles – most strains of cannabis beautifully complement the flavor of coconut oil! Canna oil makes medicating super accessible, t…

How to make cannabutter

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Contents

  1. What you’ll need
  2. Step-by-step instructions
  3. Other cannabutter recipes
  4. Ingredients matter
  5. Get the right potency
  6. How to eat cannabutter

Butter is one of those ingredients that seems to make any meal better.

Want delicious and creamy mashed potatoes? Add butter. Craving some Belgian waffles? Don’t forget the butter. Even grilled cabbage is better with butter.

As the cannabis edibles market appears poised for continuous expansion, it really shouldn’t be any big surprise that cannabis and butter could make a delightful pairing. It is the versatility of butter that gives cannabutter wide appeal. It can be used in any recipe requiring butter, whether simply adding it to toast or making a more involved meal such as lemon butter chicken. With butter being a kitchen staple, cannabutter can serve as the foundation of many homemade edibles recipes β€” including the ever-popular chocolate brownie.

What you’ll need

This cannabutter recipe isn’t terribly complicated, but it does take time. You’ll need about 3 hours for actual cook time. But before you get cooking, you’ll need some supplies.

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup (2 sticks), or 226 grams, of unsalted butter
  • 3.5 grams of ground cannabis (15% THC)

Materials:

  • Scale
  • Grinder (optional)
  • Baking sheet
  • Parchment paper
  • Double boiler
  • Metal mesh strainer
  • Cheesecloth
  • Spatula/other utensils
  • Candy thermometer
  • Mason jar

First, assemble all the ingredients and materials needed to make cannabutter. Photo by: Gina Coleman/Weedmaps

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Flower is essentially cannabis buds, which have the most cannabinoids. To decarboxylate (or decarb) simply means to heat the marijuana flower in order to turn the non-intoxicating tetrahydrocannabinolic acid (THCA) into the intoxicating delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). This step is required when cannabis is ingested rather than smoked.

To decarb means to heat the marijuana flower in order to turn the non-intoxicating THCA into the intoxicating THC. Photo by: Gina Coleman/Weedmaps

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For this recipe, you’ll need 2 sticks of butter for every eighth, or 3.5 grams, of marijuana. Here is how the math breaks down:

One gram of cannabis flower is equal to 1,000 milligrams. If the cannabis flower you’re using tests at 15% THC, then using 1 gram will produce 150 milligrams of THC. With 3.5 grams of flower, it will make 525 milligrams of THC.

Step-by-step instructions

Step 1: First, we’re going to decarboxylate the weed. Use a hand grinder to break apart the flower. Put parchment paper on a baking sheet and spread the herb evenly across the surface.

Put parchment paper on a baking sheet and spread the herb evenly across the surface and place in the oven. Photo by: Gina Coleman/Weedmaps

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Step 2: Preheat the oven to 220 degrees Fahrenheit, or about 105 degrees Celsius, place the sheet in the oven and heat for 30 minutes.

Step 3: While the weed is decarboxylating, set up the double boiler and warm the butter to degrees Fahrenheit, or about 105 degrees Celsius as well. This will finish decarbing any weed that wasn’t completely converted.

Step 4: Once the weed comes out of the oven, pour it into the room temperature, melted butter and stir well.

Step 5: Keep the butter at the same temperature for 45 minutes.

Step 6: Remove the butter from the stove. Filter it through a metal mesh strainer lined with two layers of cheesecloth.

Filter the butter through a metal mesh strainer lined with two layers of cheesecloth. Photo by: Gina Coleman/Weedmaps

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Step 7: Gently squeeze the plant matter to get the majority of the butter out. Do not squeeze to excess, as you don’t want plant matter or unnecessary compounds entering the mix.

Step 8: Refrigerate the butter while preparing the rest of the ingredients so that it’s still soft, but a little more firm for smooth and even mixing.

Step 9: Your cannabis butter is ready to eat. It will keep up to two months in the fridge and six months in the freezer.

Other cannabutter recipes

Of course, the above isn’t the only way to go about making weed butter. The cannabis chef community has whipped up a few alternatives over the years to simplify the infused-food-making process, as long as you have the right tools.

How to make slow cooker cannabutter

To create cannabis butter in your slow cooker, you’ll need to assemble the following ingredients and supplies:

  • A slow cooker
  • Metal strainer
  • 16 ounces of water
  • 16 ounces/4 sticks of butter
  • ΒΌ ounce of cannabis flower, ground using a hand grinder
  • A storage container

Turn on the slow cooker to low heat or its lowest setting. Add all the ingredients and give them a good stir. Secure the lid and allow your butter to cook for 12-18 hours: the longer it cooks, the more potent. Once you’re done cooking, pour the weed butter through a metal strainer into a separate bowl to remove the plant material. Place the butter in the refrigerator to cool, and as it hardens, the water will separate. Once it’s cold, remove the butter from the water and store it in an airtight container.

The cannabis chef community has whipped up a few alternatives over the years to simplify the infused-food-making process, like making cannabutter in a slow cooker. Photo by: Gina Coleman/Weedmaps

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How to make sous vide cannabutter

It’s also simple to make cannabis-infused butter using the sous vide method. To begin, assemble the following tools and ingredients:

  • Sous vide cooking device
  • A large pot
  • A large Ziploc bag
  • 16 ounces/4 sticks of butter – melted
  • ΒΌ ounce of ground, decarbed cannabis flower
  • Metal strainer

Pour the melted butter into a Ziploc bag, making sure it’s cooled enough so that it doesn’t melt the bag. Decarb your cannabis as described above to convert the THCA to THC, and add the flower to the bag.

Set your sous vide cooking device to 185 degrees Fahrenheit and gently add the bag to the water. Leave a small opening at the top of the bag as you lower it into the water so the pressure can force the air out of the bag. Once the water level reaches just below the opening, seal the bag and fully submerge. Allow the bag to soak for four hours. When it’s done, remove the bag from the water bath and pour the mixture into a bowl or jar through the metal strainer to remove the plant material. Use immediately or store the infused butter in a jar for later use.

Ingredients matter

Quality is always important to keep in mind when you are using cannabis – especially if you’ll be eating it. Many states that have legalized adult-use or medical cannabis require laboratory testing as part of licensing for marijuana dispensaries – but not all of them do. If your state does not yet require laboratory testing, make sure the cannabis you purchase is third-party tested.

Quality is always important to keep in mind when you are using cannabis – especially if you’ll be eating it. Photo by: Gina Coleman/Weedmaps

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If your state does require testing, learn about what your state’s dispensaries must test. Cannabis plants are very susceptible to absorbing everything they’re exposed to during cultivation, which can include pesticides and heavy metals. Each state that requires lab testing may have varying maximum allowed levels for these and other unwanted toxicants, including mold and fungal contaminants.

Quality counts for the butter you buy, too.

Get the right potency

Knowing how strong your cannabis is will impact how much cannabutter you should use once you’re ready to get cooking, or eating. When buying your cannabis flower for your cannabutter, make sure you know its cannabinoid and terpene profiles, as well as if its THC-dominant, CBD-dominant, or a more balanced mixture. These can all have an impact on the effect that cannabis will have on you.

Reading the label and the laboratory certificate of analysis, and asking your budtender can all help get you this information. If you are looking for a more mellow high or are a beginner, you’ll want to avoid THC-dominant cannabis.

Once you have the right potency for yourself and you’ve made your cannabutter, you can use that information to determine how much of your custom cannabutter to use for your various recipes. A more mild cannabutter may require a teaspoon for your smoothie, but a very potent butter would use much less. There will be some trial-and-error involved so you’ll want to start in smaller increments no matter which food or drink you’re making.

How to eat cannabutter

The possibilities are endless when it comes to eating cannabutter. For non-cooking types, just toast some bread and spread the cannabutter right on. For hobbyist chefs, there are a number of cannabis cookbooks and fun recipes exploring how to make edibles.

The possibilities are endless when it comes to eating cannabutter. Photo by: Gina Coleman/Weedmaps

How to make cannabutter Copy article link to clipboard. Link copied to clipboard. Contents What you’ll need Step-by-step instructions Other cannabutter recipes